Aslan’s Country

Narnia-3_Aslan_welcomes

So it’s finals week and we all know what that means; procrastination has once again become my best friend. This particular bout of procrastination has left me watching mystical movies full of fantasy and wonder. The best thing I’ve done so far? Watch one of my favorite movies, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Such a beautiful movie. Along with some serious adventure, there is very real toil and temptation, victory and triumph, and the always welcome presence of Aslan, whom I would just like to ride every time I see him.

If you’ve been living under a rock for the past 60 years, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is the third published book from  the critically acclaimed series The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis (read them, you won’t be disappointed, I swear). In short, Aslan represents God and is portrayed in the form of a mighty lion who rules over the mythical land of Narnia. (I met a child named Aslan once. I’ve never wanted to babysit anyone more than that kid in my entire life). I know, if you don’t know about it, this story sounds ridiculous, but it’s one of the greatest stories I have ever read.

Getting to the point of this post, there is a particular scene at the end of the movie that just moves me to tears. And yes, I will spoil the ending for you, so here is your alert *read ahead at your own risk*.

The whole movie, there is talk of “Aslan’s Country.” It lies at the end of the world, the farthest East that you can travel and is said to reside behind the place where “the water meets the sky.” The cusp of the Earth, if you can imagine.  In the movie, it is not shown, but lies behind a great wall of majestic ocean water, as seen in the photo above. It is an obvious analogy for Heaven, just as Aslan is an analogy to Christ.

As the characters meet with Aslan, just outside of his country, it is revealed that three of the characters, Lucy, Edmund, and Eustace, will not be entering Aslan’s Country just yet or returning to Narnia, and will never see Aslan again in their lifetimes. As they leave, Edmund bows before Aslan, and that’s when the water-works start for me. The only thing that I can think of when I was watching the film was, “I want to bow before the Lord at the edge of his everlasting kingdom!” Sappy, right? But still, the deepest desire of my little heart.

I think the real reason that this movie gets me at the end is because throughout the duration of the movie, I think that this particular facet of the Chronicles hits us right in the humanity. That is to say, we can relate to it most, because a very big motif in the movie is temptation. Characters are tempted by beauty and gold, anger and pride, you name it, it’s  there. So when it does get to the end of the movie, and the characters have overcome their temptations-successfully, might I add-they are able to stand before Aslan, with a sense of dignity, and a moral character that has been proven mighty.

This might sound a little arrogant, I assure you, it is not. The point that I am trying to make is that with the good help of our Lord, we can withstand anything that he will set in front of us. And in the end, we can come before Him, at the threshold of his everlasting country, with a sense of dignity, that only proves to be seriously wane in lieu of the majesty of our Father, God.

As I said before, all I want is the chance to bow in the presence of our Lord. Fully, truly, and completely.

But really though, this post would make much more sense if you would just watch the movies. Scratch that. Read the books, they’re minuscule, and you could most likely read the book in the same amount of time it takes you to watch the movie. Or better yet, do both, because this story is one that should be known.

“But there I have another name. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there.”

– Aslan

In Christ and Mary,

Kate ❤

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